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7 Wondrous National Parks in Wyoming

The sunset shines a dark purple glow on pointed mountain peaks reflected in a lake
Unsplash/Toan Chu

Wyoming has plenty of beautiful national parks to visit. Most people don’t know that there are seven national parks in Wyoming, and many don’t realize how amazing they are.

If you are looking for some new places to explore, consider visiting one of these seven wondrous national parks in Wyoming. These include the two most famous, Yellowstone and Grand Teton, but also Fossil Butte, Devils Tower, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway, Bighorn Canyon, and Fort Laramie!

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Land Acknowledgment: This post promotes travel to native lands. We honor all Indigenous caretakers of these lands and waters, the elders who lived here before, the Indigenous today, and the generations to come.

Map of the National Parks in Wyoming

A map of Wyoming in blue with the national parks in Wyoming in green

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

Bighorn Canyon, Wyoming side

This park is located on the border of Montana and Wyoming. It has a lot to offer, including camping, boating, fishing, hiking and so much more!

On the Wyoming side of the canyon, popular attractions include the Cal Taggart Visitor Center, Horseshoe Bend Marina, Devil Canyon Overlook, Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, several hiking trails, three campgrounds, and historic ranches open for self-guided tours.

Step into the wild and wonderful world of Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area with its breathtaking views, diverse wildlife populations, and 10,000 years worth of human history to explore. This vast landscape has something that will suit anyone who seeking a unique experience in the Wyoming national parks.

How to Get ThereClick here

MapClick here

Things to Do: Boating, fishing, hiking, tours, hunting, picnicking

Park Entrance Fee: None

Where to StayWestern Motel, Travelodge, Cattlemen Motel, Wyoming High Country Lodge

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 548-5406

Devils Tower National Monument

A rock monolith rises above a winding road at one of the national parks in Wyoming
Unsplash/Todd Trapani

This National Monument is one of the most famous national parks in Wyoming.

It protects a strange geological formation that looks like a monolith reaching up into space or some other strange attraction from another planet. Perhaps that’s why it was featured in Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.

In addition to its spotlight in Hollywood, Devils Tower is also an important cultural resource. The local tribal nations refer to it as Bears Lodge and hope the National Monument will soon change its name.

Furthermore, climbers are prohibited from summiting the rock during the month of June, which is reserved for Native Americans to pay their respects.

Visitors can enjoy a few hiking trails, stay in the campground, or even rock climb to the top!

How to Get ThereClick here

MapClick here

Things to Do: Hiking, stargazing, climbing, ranger programs

Park Entrance Fee: $25/vehicle, $20/motorcycle, or $15/individual (on foot or bicycle), all fees valid for 7 days

Where to StaySawin’ Logs Inn, Devils Tower Lodge

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 467-5283 x635

Fort Laramie National Historic Site

A group of historic re-enactors fold a large American flag at one of the Wyoming national parks
NPS/Carol Stevenson

When people think of the Old West, they usually imagine a cast of rough and tumble cowboys. And while Wyoming was definitely home to plenty of those types, it also has another claim from that era: Fort Laramie.

This is one of the most well-preserved forts in the United States. It’s even been designated a World Heritage Site.

Founded in 1834, Fort Laramie served as an important trading post and military outpost for the United States Army during its conflicts with Native Americans before disappearing after the Battle of Little Bighorn (also called Custer’s Last Stand).

Today it is preserved not only to remember this history but also to show how the US government and Native American tribes interacted.

If you’re interested in seeing what life was like during this time, consider visiting Fort Laramie National Historic Site!

How to Get ThereClick here

MapClick here

Things to Do: Historic re-enactments, tours, ranger programs, hiking

Park Entrance Fee: None

Where to StayCobblestone Inn & Suites, Bunkhouse Motel, Travelodge

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 837-2221 x3002

Fossil Butte National Monument

A set of fossilized remains
NPS Photo

This National Monument protects the fossils of an ancient lake that once covered most of southern Wyoming. It’s a great place to go for both professional and amateur paleontologists.

The visitor center is open every day except Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. The museum features exhibits about local wildlife through time.

Outside the visitor center, you can do a number of hikes. These include Fossil Lake Trail, which provides access to the fossil bed site and Fortification Hill for some amazing views. Furthermore, the Red Gulch/Alkali National Back Country Byway is perfect for mountain bikers.

How to Get ThereClick here

MapClick here

Things to Do: Hiking trails, museum, ranger programs

Park Entrance Fee: None

Where to StayBest Western Plus, Antler Motel, Super 8

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 877-4455

Grand Teton National Park

A forest of evergreen trees on a lakeside with granite mountains in the background
Unsplash/Jake Johnson

Another extremely popular national park is Grand Teton. This was originally two separate parks: Grand Teton and Jackson Hole National Monument. In 1950, they were combined to form the current park we know today.

In addition to being a national park, Grand Teton is also part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This means it’s home to many wild animals that attract millions of visitors. Some of the wildlife you may see when visiting the national parks in Wyoming include grizzly bears, black bears, moose, bison, elk, deer, pronghorn, wolves, beavers, otters, and mountain goats.

If you’re nervous about wildlife encounters, be sure to read my bear safety tips before you visit Grand Teton.

Also of note is the Jenny Lake Visitor Center which has exhibits about local wildlife as well as a park film that plays every hour.

How to Get ThereClick here

MapClick here

Things to Do: Ranger programs, scenic drives, hiking, camping, backpacking, biking, fishing, boating, climbing, horseback riding

Park Entrance Fee: $35/vehicle, $30/motorcycle, $20/individual (hiker or bicyclist), all fees valid for 7 days

Where to StaySpring Creek Ranch, Huff House Inn, Miller Park Lodge, Elk Refuge Inn

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 739-3399

John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway

John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway

This National Park sits between Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks and is a scenic drive that showcases some of the most beautiful parts of both. It’s also known for its wildlife viewing opportunities, which makes it perfect for amateur nature photographers.

Just remember to always check road conditions before heading out!

Things to Do: Scenic drives

Park Entrance Fee: None

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 739-3399

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone Hotsprings

This park is famous for being the first national park in the world. It was created in 1872 and protects around three thousand square miles of Wyoming. It is home to half the world’s geysers, including Steamboat Geyser, which erupts every 40 minutes!

Yellowstone also has its own herd of bison (or buffalo), elk, antelope, black bears (with some grizzly bears and wolf packs in the northernmost areas of the park). You can also enjoy a variety of tree species, over one hundred waterfalls (no matter what time of year), and even an active volcano!

This expansive and diverse Wyoming national park deserves plenty of time to explore. Check out my 4-day Yellowstone itinerary to plan your trip and see the best things to do in Yellowstone.

How to Get ThereClick here

MapClick here

Things to Do: Ranger programs, geyser basins, hiking, backpacking, camping, fishing, photography, tours, boating, biking, skiing, snowshoeing, horseback riding

Park Entrance Fee: $35/vehicle, $30/motorcycle, $20/individual (hiker or bicyclist), all fees valid for 7 days

Where to StayYellowstone Park Hotel, Kelly Inn, Absaroka Lodge, Cowboys Lodge

Official WebsiteClick here

Speak to a Park Ranger: (307) 344-7381

Pin the Wyoming National Parks

We hope you enjoyed reading about the seven national parks in Wyoming! Any of them make an excellent destination for your next vacation. Let us know if you need help planning your trip in the comments or via e-mail.

Most people don't realize that there are 7 national parks in Wyoming. Visit the Parks Expert to explore them all, from the most famous to the most obscure.
Most people don't realize that there are 7 national parks in Wyoming. Visit the Parks Expert to explore them all, from the most famous to the most obscure.
Most people don't realize that there are 7 national parks in Wyoming. Visit the Parks Expert to explore them all, from the most famous to the most obscure.

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